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LRC Community Users

state of alabama depicted with text Alabama Mosaic

 

AlabamaMosaic is a repository of digital materials on Alabama's history, culture, places, and people. Its purpose is to make unique historical treasures from Alabama's archives, libraries, museums, and other repositories electronically accessible to Alabama residents and to students, researchers, and the general public in other states and countries. 

 

The American Archivists Society of American Archivists

The American Archivist was established in 1938 and quickly became the leading journal in the archival field. The SAA Newsletter started in the 1970s and evolved into an award-winning magazine, Archival Outlook. And for decades, SAA books have nurtured and educated generations of archivists.

 

Chronicling America Historic American Newspapers

Search America's historic newspaper pages from 1789-1963 or use the U.S. Newspaper Directory to find information about American newspapers published between 1690-present. Chronicling America is sponsored jointly by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress. Learn more.

Enslaved: Peoples of the Historical Slave Trade

From the Washington Post article:

"...Enslaved: Peoples of the Historic Slave Trade, a free, public clearinghouse that launched Tuesday with seven smaller, searchable databases, will for the first time allow anyone from academic historians to amateur family genealogists to search for individual enslaved people around the globe in one central online location...Directed by data scientists at Michigan State University and four principal investigators, including [Prof. Daryle] Williams at U-Md., the project debuted with information about 500,000 named enslaved people and their circumstances, collected by some of the world's foremost historians of slavery. More records of enslaved people, ethnic groups, populations and places will be entered over time as partnerships are forged with academics, archives, museums and other repositories of information...."

Full article here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/history/2020/12/01/slavery-database-family-genealogy/

Library in bold black print with Library of Congress in small orange text

Welcome Message from Carla Hayden, 14th Librarian of Congress

The Library of Congress is the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, newspapers, maps and manuscripts in its collections. The Library is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.

The Library preserves and provides access to a rich, diverse and enduring source of knowledge to inform, inspire and engage you in your intellectual and creative endeavors. Whether you are new to the Library of Congress or an experienced researcher, we have a world-class staff ready to assist you online and in person.

I encourage you to visit the Library of Congress in person in Washington, D.C., explore the Library online from wherever you are and connect with us on social media.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden
Librarian of Congress

The Met 150 in red bold letters

According to metmuseum.org/about-the-met, "The Metropolitan Museum of Art presents over 5,000 years of art from around the world for everyone to experience and enjoy. The Museum lives in two iconic sites in New York City—The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters. Millions of people also take part in The Met experience online.

Since its founding in 1870, The Met has always aspired to be more than a treasury of rare and beautiful objects. Every day, art comes alive in the Museum's galleries and through its exhibitions and events, revealing new ideas and unexpected connections across time and across cultures."

"The HistoryMakers is a national 501(c)(3) non-profit research and educational institution committed to preserving and making widely accessible the untold personal stories of both well-known and unsung African Americans. Through the media and a series of user-friendly products, services and events, The HistoryMakers enlightens, entertains and educates the public, helping to refashion a more inclusive record of American history." (www.thehistorymakers.org/about-us).

"The testimonies captured in The HistoryMakers Collection – conducted in homes and offices across the United States and abroad – reveal the broad scope of narratives of African American men and women who have made significant contributions to American life, history, and culture during the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Many of these contributions have largely been untold and unrecorded; and, as a result, are still largely “unknown”. They are “America’s Missing Stories."  (www.thehistorymakers.org/background)

Visit AAMU's Guide for use of this resource here,  https://libguides.aamu.edu/historymakers.