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William Hooper Councill: William Hooper Councill Speeches

National Race Councill

  • William Hooper Councill delivered an address in Nashville, TN on September 1, 1897. The objective of the address was to fully and to well set forth in the public prints of the country to require any extended remarks at that time.          
  • He also discusses solutions that could help the South progress. Councill strongly believed that the best black men and the best white men of the South could come together and provide an effective solution.

Speech before Eureka Club Lyceum

  • William Hooper Councill also gave a speech before Eureka Club Lyceum in Decatur, AL, on August 7, 1905.
  • In this speech, William touched base on the epidemic of criminality. "Let us starve the criminal lawyers and put all the Sheriffs into the poorhouses by giving them nothing to do. He thoroughly explains how white people often formed a opinion of the black race from the accounts which they had read in public prints. These reports were producing a negative reputation leaving other races to misjudge the characteristics of black people.

Speech At Payne University

  • William Hooper Councill gave a speech at Payne University in Selma, Alabama on October 2, 1995.
  • In this speech, Councill is stressing how important it is to save the communities by educating each other, stopping crime against one another, and also having a good heart and good morals in order to represent the black race in a professional way. Only then can the black race be taken more seriously and rewarded more respect.

Sources

  • Davis, Eddie E. (2013), The Greatest Negro the Race Ever Produced.  Presh4Word Publishing, LLC: Alabama
  • Morrison, Richard, D. (1994), History of Alabama Agricultural & Mechanical  University 1875-1992. Golden Rule Printers: Alabama