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PHY 101- Physical Science I: The Atom

This guide complements the course for Physical Science I

The Atom

Chapter 9 of your textbook talks about the Atom. Topics include the quantum theory of light, matter waves, the hydrogen atom, and the quantum theory of the atom.

Resources

The Behavior of Atoms

The Behavior of Atoms

"Explores the phases of matter—solids, liquids, and gases—and how particles in a given phase interact with each other. Phase diagrams explain at what temperature and pressure a given substance will be in a solid, liquid, or gas phase. Practical problems, like how to safely store enough hydrogen gas to power an automobile, are solved by understanding the different behaviors of solids, liquids, and gases."

Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

"All matter in the observable universe—from a single blade of grass to a planet in a faraway galaxy—is made up of atoms, molecules, and compounds. This program introduces these minuscule building blocks in five sections: The Nucleus (protons and neutrons, energy shells, binding energy, fission and fusion); The Electrons (quantum numbers, spdf orbitals); The Elements (periodic table, valence electrons, ions and ionization energy, electronegativity, covalent and ionic bonds); The Energy of Atoms (exothermic and endothermic reactions, spontaneous reactions, Gibbs free energy, activation energy, catalysts); and Common Compounds (properties of sodium chloride and water, polarity)."

Atoms and Light

Atoms and Light

"Identification of electrons, protons, and neutrons led to a modern subatomic theory. The study of atomic spectra—the light given off by atoms at definite wavelengths—led to the Bohr atomic model, where electrons at distinct energy levels move between these levels by absorbing and emitting discrete quanta of energy. The measurement of atomic spectra has applications in astrophysics as well as forensic chemistry. "